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  • Rustic Home > Food > Cooking Terms

  • Certain terms or phrases occur with regularity in egg recipes. Here are many of them along with an explanation.

  • can be a little confusing so I have provided this page of definitions for frequently used terms found in recipes.





    cream
  • beat thoroughly and conclusively in a competition or fight; "We licked the other team on Sunday!"

  • the best people or things in a group; "the cream of England's young men were killed in the Great War"

  • Mash (a cooked vegetable) and mix with milk or cream

  • Add cream to (coffee)

  • Work (butter, typically with sugar) to form a smooth soft paste

  • make creamy by beating; "Cream the butter"











cooking terms cream - The New




The New Food Lover's Companion


The New Food Lover's Companion



The brand-new fourth edition of this widely praised reference guide has been updated with new information for everyone, including lovers of ethnic foods and health food aficionados. The authors have added many all-new entries on exotic produce and other unusual ingredients. An earlier edition of The New Food Lover's Companion was hailed by Bon App©tit magazine as "one of the best reference books we've seen, a must for every cook's library." This new edition has even more to offer! Among the myriad foods and culinary subjects defined and explained are cooking tools and techniques, meat cuts, breads, pastas, international foods, cheeses, eggs and omelets, herbs and spices, fruits and vegetables, candies and desserts, wines and cocktails, and literally everything else related to good food and enjoyable dining. Handy and helpful appendices cover a wide range of food-related topics. They include suggestions for substituting recipe ingredients, high-altitude baking adjustments, a microwave oven conversion chart, recommended safe cooking temperatures for various meats and fish, a guide to reading food package labels, seasoning suggestions to enhance favorite dishes, a food additives directory, and much more. The New Food Lover's Companion is a reference guide--not a cookbook--but it includes hundreds of cooking tips plus an extensive bibliography of recommended cookbooks and other food-related literature. Here in one volume is an invaluable companion for cooks--and for everybody else who loves good food. More than 6,700 entries plus line art that shows retail cuts of lamb, pork, beef, and veal.










89% (7)





Bánh Cu?n (Savory Rice Rolls)




Bánh Cu?n (Savory Rice Rolls)





This dish is very difficult to make at home.
You can order this dish at Dao's TaiPan
446 N. Wilmot. Tucson AZ 722-0055

How can I justly translate “Banh Cu?n” into an English? I have no idea. Banh is a basic term equivalent of the English word, pastry. However, in Vietnamese banh can be anything sweet or savory, from cookies to cakes and of course, pastries. Cu?n means to roll. With that said, this dish is called banh cu?n because you take rice flour sheets aka “banh”, you add filling and “cu?n”; roll it up. Banh Cu?n is similar to Chinese rice rolls; the ones served at dim sum that are filled with either shrimp or pork and served with soy sauce. I must say this recipe is only for those truly into cooking. These rolls require time, lots of patience and endurance to hot steam. For those who want the easier road, just buy chinese rice ribbons (premade, the kind they cut up to make chow fun), add filling and roll. These rolls should be somewhat transparent, thin, and have a smooth silky texture.

Filling:
-1/4lb ground pork
-1/2 large onion
-100g chinese black fungus (woodear mushrooms)
-1 tbs fish sauce
-1 tsp pepper
-salt and sugar to taste

*Chop onion and fungus. Heat 1 tbs oil in a pan add meat and stir fry for a few mins, add onion, fungus, fish sauce, and pepper. Continue to stir fry on high heat until the onions are transparent. Add salt and sugar to taste.

For the “Wrappers”:
-150g rice flour
-100g tapioca starch
-4 cups water (960g/ml)
-1 tbs oil
-1 tsp salt

*Mix everything together, rest for 1/2 hour before making wrappers.

Making the Wrappers:
There are 2 ways to get this job done. The first is the easiest, but taste wise, the second method is the best.

1) Easiest, use a non stick frying pan, heat over medium heat pour in about 3 tbs batter. Tilt and the pan in a circular motion to cream a even round wrapper. Cover for 1 min, “flip” the wrapper out onto a serving try, add filling and roll. Roll and as you make the wrappers.

2) Fill a pot half full with water. Tightly tie a thin piece of cloth on top of the pot. Bring the water to a boil, ladle on some batter and spread it around (the batter will drip to the bottom). Steam for a few mins, now the real work begins. ;) Ladle on some batter and spread it thin, cover and steam for a minute or two. Add filling and roll (using a thin spatula dipped in water). Carefully transfer the rolls onto a plate.

To Serve:
Serve with cooked beans sprouts, fish sauce, ch? l?a (Vietnamese ‘ham’), meat floss, and fried shallots.











The tail end of an artichoke




The tail end of an artichoke





A bit earlier in the fall I spent a couple of deeply pleasant late afternoons shooting just about every vegetable in my house, amongst which at the time were the lovely sage tinted artichoke pictured above.


* For the next little while I'm going to be adding this message beneath the description of my most recent upload or two. I hope no one minds, but I feel I need to share the following with my viewers and Flickr friends. *

Over the course of the spring and summer, I've not been able to spend as much time on Flickr as I would have ideally liked to.This arises largely from matters relating to my health, for as some of you know, I duke it out daily with a number of chronic illnesses. I haven't been having the best of times medically speaking lately, yet saying this carries a sense of irony with it, for spending time taking photos and in turn immersing myself in the resplendent, imaginative, inspiring work of others is often phenomenally cathartic and uplifting.

I apologize to those of you whose streams I used to comment and "fave" on more frequently, as well as to all who have done the same for me and not received a thank you or visit to your stream yet. I truly adore and value each comment my photos receive, and appreciate your visit so very much.

I realize - true to my usual form - I may have been spending an unrealistically sustainable amount of time on Flickr earlier in the year. When I adore something (in this case photography + Flickr) I tend to devote an inordinate amount of time to it, often exceeding what I'm able to physically keep up. Having been at both extremes (hours a day on Flickr, weeks without a single upload), it becomes obvious that, as with most things in life, the key here will be balance - and cutting myself some slack for those days (or even weeks, as the case may be) when I'm not able to focus on Flickr as much as I'd like to.

I believe that as the coming autumn and winter unfold I will hit a more realistic stride in terms of finding a feasible balance that works well for me.

Thank you each deeply for your understanding in this matter.


May the muse of creativity be with you all,
¦ Jessica









cooking terms cream








cooking terms cream




Dictionary of Food: International Food and Cooking Terms from A to Z






The Dictionary of Food is the indispensable companion for everyone who loves reading about food, or cooking it. We live in a globalised world, and our tastes in food have widened dramatically in recent years. The Dictionary of Food reflects this huge cultural shift. With concise descriptions of dishes, ingredients, equipment, and techniques, it brings the world's cuisines, familiar and less familiar, within our grasp.



'… so interesting that it only stayed on my desk very briefly before it was taken away… invaluable in anyone's kitchen and particularly useful for professional chefs.' - Caroline Waldegrave, Leiths School of Food and Wine

The Dictionary of Food is the indispensable companion for everyone who loves reading about food, or cooking it. We live in a globalised world, and our tastes in food have widened dramatically in recent years. The Dictionary of Food reflects this huge cultural shift. With concise descriptions of dishes, ingredients, equipment, and techniques, it brings the world's cuisines, familiar and less familiar, within our grasp.



'… so interesting that it only stayed on my desk very briefly before it was taken away… invaluable in anyone's kitchen and particularly useful for professional chefs.' - Caroline Waldegrave, Leiths School of Food and Wine










See also:

online cooking clubs

cooking schools in miami

thai farm cooking

new cooking games 2011

cooking class ireland

metropolitan cooking and entertaining show 2011

tuscany cooking class

cooking mama 2 game online

healthy cooking shows



07
2011

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